Australia’s iron(ic) curtain hurting China ties

Gregory McCarthy, PKU/ EAF/ 20 February 2018

2017 was earmarked to celebrate 45 years of Australian–Chinese diplomatic relations. Instead, Australia alleged that China interfered in its national affairs and the China Daily reported that an on-line poll had voted Australia as the ‘least friendly nation to China in 2017’. Likewise, a Global Times editorial accused Australia of McCarthyism and said that Australia had gone insane regarding the issue of China. Continue reading “Australia’s iron(ic) curtain hurting China ties”

Advertisements

Taiwan’s President: Fighting for Reform

by Michael J. Fonte / 

President Tsai Ing-wen is a sophisticated, professional woman with a strong resume: lawyer, World Trade Organization negotiator, Mainland Affairs Council chair, legislator, vice premier, Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) chair. Organization negotiators will tell you that her attention to detail was stunning and she carries that characteristic today as president. Continue reading “Taiwan’s President: Fighting for Reform”

Duterte’s Evolving South China Sea Policy

by Aileen Baviera / Maritime Issues / January 25, 2018

Presidential prerogative 
President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines has been criticized by some quarters as flip flopping with his foreign policy, particularly on how to manage the territorial and maritime disputes with China in the South China Sea.[1] This is causing confusion even among his domestic public, his country’s traditional allies, ASEAN neighbors, and – one can safely presume – China. Continue reading “Duterte’s Evolving South China Sea Policy”

How China Is Winning Back More Graduates From Foreign Universities Than Ever Before

by Luke Kelly / 25 January 2018/ Forbes

Where it was once inevitable that those who left to study at prestigious foreign universities would remain on distant shores for years, China’s graduates are now answering the call of home more than ever before — and many are turning down lucrative careers on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley in favor of Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. Continue reading “How China Is Winning Back More Graduates From Foreign Universities Than Ever Before”

By 

BEIJING — Winters in Beijing have long been choked by thick, dusty, toxic smog. But this winter, the sky has taken on a once seemingly unthinkable hue: blue.

Now, an analysis of government data by Greenpeace has confirmed what many people could see but that nonetheless seemed too good to be true. Continue reading “A Blue Sky in Beijing? It’s Not a Fluke, Says Greenpeace”

Developing or developed? Assessing Chinese life expectancy

by China Power

Decades of breakneck economic growth have raised questions regarding China’s level of development. By some measures, China is still developing. In other ways, China compares favorably with developed nations. In terms of public health, however, China’s development is not yet complete. Continue reading “Developing or developed? Assessing Chinese life expectancy”

Making China Great Again

By Evan Osnos / January 8, 2018/ The New Yorker

When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. Within two weeks, however, “Wolf Warrior II” had become the highest-grossing Chinese movie of all time. Some crowds gave it standing ovations; others sang the national anthem. In October, China selected it as its official entry in the foreign-language category of the Academy Awards. Continue reading “Making China Great Again”

Will the real China please stand up? A Southeast Asian perspective on China’s growing power and influence

by Aileen S.P. Baviera / (This article originally appeared in Japanese translation in Gaiko (Diplomacy), Vol 46, Nov./Dec. 2017, pp. 43-49) / English version from APPFI

The first five years of Xi Jinping’s rule saw major changes in Chinese policy that have affected its relations with Southeast Asia. With a slowing economy in need of difficult restructuring, a global financial crisis threatening China’s markets and sources of investments, the Communist Party facing issues of legitimacy amidst rampant corruption, and serious environmental problems threatening growth and people’s welfare, Xi set out on a direction that was rather unexpected. He began to assert strong central authority domestically; waged a sustained anti-corruption campaign (that also masked a purge of political rivals); took steps to raise China’s economic, political and military profile abroad; and began to contest some rules of the international order which China had been dissatisfied with. Xi abandoned Deng Xiaoping’s exhortation – obeyed by his predecessors Jiang Zemin and Hu Jintao – that China keep to strategic patience, remain low-key, and “bide its time and hide its capacities” (taoguang yanghui韬光养晦 ). Continue reading “Will the real China please stand up? A Southeast Asian perspective on China’s growing power and influence”