China Dropped Its One-Child Policy. So Why Aren’t Chinese Women Having More Babies?

 

In late 2015, when China eased its decades-long policy limiting most couples to having only one child, some heralded the change as a move toward greater reproductive freedom. But the government was only embarking on another grand experiment in population engineering: This time it was urging women — though only the right sort — to reproduce for China. Continue reading “China Dropped Its One-Child Policy. So Why Aren’t Chinese Women Having More Babies?”

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As U.S. Culls Diplomats, China Is Empowering Its Ambassadors

Bloomberg News / 

While U.S. diplomats endure staff cuts and low morale, China’s own foreign service is undergoing a revival.

The ruling Communist Party has ordered a sweeping overhaul of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs aimed at making China a more effective global player, according to four people familiar with the matter. The plan calls for most agencies to stop replacing staff in Chinese embassies by next year, giving ambassadors direct control over their portfolios, said two of the people, who requested anonymity because they’re not authorized to speak to media. Continue reading “As U.S. Culls Diplomats, China Is Empowering Its Ambassadors”

ASEAN ‘concern’ resurfaces over contested waters with China

by TAKASHI NAKANO/ Nikkei Asian Review/ 7 February 2018

SINGAPORE — The situation in the South China Sea, where China has moved aggressively amid conflicting territorial claims, was highlighted as a source of concern in an ASEAN foreign ministers’ statement released Tuesday, with Singapore taking a more balanced approach as this year’s chair than the Philippines did in 2017. Continue reading “ASEAN ‘concern’ resurfaces over contested waters with China”

China and global economic risks

Author: Editorial Board, East Asia Forum

On the surface of it, the global economic recovery looks stronger day by day. The International Monetary Fund has upped its forecasts and the underlying real growth trend in major industrialised country markets seems at last to validate the continuing exuberance of stock markets around the world. Continue reading “China and global economic risks”

People’s Daily: China should “grasp historic opportunity”

(Xinhua)  / January 16, 2018

BEIJING, Jan. 15 (Xinhua) — The People’s Daily, the Communist Party of China (CPC) flagship newspaper, published an article Monday calling for efforts to grasp the historic opportunity facing China. Continue reading “People’s Daily: China should “grasp historic opportunity””

What can we expect in China in 2018?

by Gordon Orr/ December 2017/ McKinsey

The nation could be shaped by geopolitics, momentum from robust economic growth, and a host of new leaders eager to implement new policy.

With so many new leaders put in position over the last six months by President Xi, an overall leader secure in his position and clear on his objectives, 2018 is likely to see much more activity to implement policies, economic and social, that move China in the direction that Xi wants. We may need to worry more about overenthusiastic implementation of policy than the inaction we have often seen in 2017. Continue reading “What can we expect in China in 2018?”

China hails year of ‘remarkable progress’ in human rights as US and EU warn situation is worsening

by Mimi Lau / 15 December 2017/ SCMP

China hailed a year of “remarkable” progress in human rights by widening its definition to praise achievements in fields such as anti-corruption and legal reform as it continued its drive to redefine the concept in the face of continued international criticism of its record. Continue reading “China hails year of ‘remarkable progress’ in human rights as US and EU warn situation is worsening”

 

US can no longer compel China to do its bidding

by David M Lampton/  10 December 2017/ Financial Review

On entering office, US President Donald Trump put several contentious issues with China on the backburner in the hope of achieving his primary goal — North Korea’s denuclearisation. When that failed, the  frontburner of US–China relations became crowded with previously repressed issues.

Several of these — US freedom of navigation operations in the South China Sea, talk of steel and aluminium tariffs, weapons sales to Taiwan, threats to tighten technology and investment flows as well as secondary sanctions on Chinese entities — threaten to become serious problems if not managed in a more careful manner than the Trump administration is currently demonstrating.

Continue reading “US can no longer compel China to do its bidding”