China threatens U.S. Congress for crossing its ‘red line’ on Taiwan

 / October 12, 2017/ The Washington Post

In a rare pressure campaign, the Chinese government is demanding that the U.S. Congress back off passing new laws that would strengthen the U.S. relationship with Taiwan. Beijing’s efforts are the latest sign that it is stepping up its campaign to exert political influence inside countries around the world, including the United States. Continue reading “China threatens U.S. Congress for crossing its ‘red line’ on Taiwan”

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Why are so Many Hongkongers Moving to Taiwan?

By Nick Westra / 1 October 2017 / SCMP

The cha chaan teng (tea cafes) started by Michael Lee in 1999 could be carbon copies of those that punctuate street corners in North Point and Mong Kok. Staple foods like century egg and pork congee, pan-fried radish cakes and French toast with thick slabs of butter are dished out around the clock to customers in Art Deco seating areas adorned with posters dripping with nostalgia for Hong Kong, the city after which the chain is named. But one thing is out of place: the cafes are 800km away, in Taipei. Continue reading “Why are so Many Hongkongers Moving to Taiwan?”

Indonesia & China: The Sea Between

by Philip Bowring / Sept 13, 2017 / NYR Daily

Indonesia has long been cautious in confronting China’s claims in the South China Sea, so its announcement on July 14 that it was renaming a part of the area the “North Natuna Sea” may have come to many as surprise. The new name encompasses a region north of the Natuna islands that partly falls within the infamous “nine dash line,” by which China claims the sea stretching fifteen hundred miles from its mainland coast almost to the shores of Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. China immediately demanded a retraction—which it will not get. Continue reading “Indonesia & China: The Sea Between”

As World Watches Kim, China Quietly Builds South China Sea Clout

By Jason Koutsoukis and Dan Murtaugh / September 6, 2017 / Bloomberg

As Kim Jong Un’s antics in North Korea capture global attention, China is quietly moving to bolster its grip on disputed territory in the South China Sea. Continue reading “As World Watches Kim, China Quietly Builds South China Sea Clout”

Explainer: what will China’s national anthem law mean for Hong Kong?

by Jeffie Lam / August 30, 2017/ SCMP

Hong Kong made headlines after hundreds of its soccer fans booed during the Chinese national anthem ahead of a World Cup qualifier between the city’s representative team and China in 2015.

Back then, the local soccer governing body was fined by international football authorities over the jeering. But such acts could soon become punishable by law in Hong Kong under proposed national anthem legislation currently making its way through the National People’s Congress, China’s top legislature. Continue reading “Explainer: what will China’s national anthem law mean for Hong Kong?”

China and India’s Border Standoff Heats Up in Kashmir

Aijaz Hussain / AP / August 17, 2017/ Time

(SRINAGAR, India) — Indian and Chinese soldiers yelled and hurled stones at one another high in the Himalayas in Indian-controlled Kashmir, Indian officials said Wednesday, potentially escalating tensions between two nations already engaged in a lengthy border standoff elsewhere. Continue reading “China and India’s Border Standoff Heats Up in Kashmir”

What to expect from Xi Jinping’s Communist Party congress power play

by Nectar Gan / 7 August 2017/ SCMP

When Xi Jinping took the helm of China’s ruling Communist Party in late 2012 he had few trusted allies by his side or loyal aides at his command.

The party’s Central Committee – its senior leadership – was stuffed with cadres handpicked by the previous leadership or the one before that, with many members occupying important jobs in the party and the government. Continue reading “What to expect from Xi Jinping’s Communist Party congress power play”

Chinese finance high-speeds into unknown territory

by Qian Han/ 31 Jully 2017 / EAF

On 23 June 2017, a court in Shanghai charged the international trading company Eastern Dragon with market manipulation in the Chinese futures markets during the 2015 stock market crash. Eastern Dragon was slammed with a US$101 million fine and two of its traders were handed out suspended prison sentences. This sets an important precedent as the first time a Chinese court has ruled on foreign high frequency trading in China. Continue reading “Chinese finance high-speeds into unknown territory”