What we know about China’s strategy when it comes to U.S.-China economic relations

By Claire Reade | August 2, 2017 on CSIS.org

July 16, 2017, marked the final deadline under the highly publicized Donald Trump–Xi Jinping 100-day action plan for resolving key U.S.-China trade issues, a major outcome of the two presidents’ April 2017 meeting in Florida. Intensive, results-oriented negotiations on a small set of specific issues were supposed to transform how effectively the United States and China would be able to solve problems. But that did not happen. Continue reading “What we know about China’s strategy when it comes to U.S.-China economic relations”

China says willing to pay the price for new North Korea sanctions

China backs joint oil drilling with PH in disputed sea

by Dona Z. Pazzibugan, Philip C. Tubeza / Philippine Daily Inquirer / 07:28 AM July 26, 2017

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi on Tuesday said that he supported the idea of joint energy exploration with the Philippines in the heavily disputed South China Sea, warning that unilateral action could cause problems and damage to both sides. Continue reading “China backs joint oil drilling with PH in disputed sea”

China’s Diplomatic Strategy and Expanding Philippines-China Political Cooperation

by Jed Aaron Rabena / July 12, 2017 / Originally Posted at CPIanalysis

In On War (1832), Carl von Clausewitz, a Prussian general and military theorist, wrote that, “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means.” Conversely, military diplomacy may be said to be political cooperation by different means or that military cooperation is an extension of political consensus. During World War I, the United States, although maintaining the “principle of armed neutrality,” supplied arms to the British against the Germans, which was seen by many as a highly symbolic political act. One may thus argue that military diplomacy is not only about signaling benign and pacifist intentions, but also has to do with sending political messages to third-party states. In fact, defense and military cooperation may be the most credible barometer of the current state of political relations because security ties reflect the existing level of strategic trust and confidence between two nation-states. Continue reading “China’s Diplomatic Strategy and Expanding Philippines-China Political Cooperation”

Beijing shifts strategy in South China Sea

by Bill Hayton / July 12, 2017 / Asia.Nikkei

One year ago, China suffered a massive legal defeat when an international tribunal based in The Hague ruled that the vast majority of Beijing’s extensive claims to maritime rights and resources in the South China Sea were not compatible with international law. Beijing was furious. Continue reading “Beijing shifts strategy in South China Sea”

CHINA’S BELT AND ROAD INITIATIVE MOVES INTO THE ARCTIC

by MIA BENNETT/ June 27, 2017 /  CRYOPOLITICS

When China convened its Belt and Road Forum in Beijing last month, most of the attention focused on the initiative’s plans for transportation infrastructure across the Eurasian landmass and the Indian Ocean. Last week, however, China formally incorporated the Arctic into its plans for maritime cooperation under the Belt and Road Initiative, also sometimes called One Belt, One Road. The Vision for Maritime Cooperation under the Belt and Road Initiativereleased on June 20 by China’s National Development and Reform Commission and the State Oceanic Administration, explains that a “blue economic passage” is “envisioned leading up to Europe via the Arctic Ocean.” Continue reading “CHINA’S BELT AND ROAD INITIATIVE MOVES INTO THE ARCTIC”

Japan’s Delicate Balancing Act in the South China Sea

by Benoit Hardy-Chartrand and J. Berkshire Miller / June 27, 2017 / NationalInterest.org

Sino-Japanese relations have long been marred by a maritime and territorial row in the East China Sea as well as a historical dispute over Japan’s wartime memory, which has prevented sustainable rapprochement. Further complicating the situation, bilateral ties are now increasingly strained by Japan’s growing presence in the South China Sea, where overlapping territorial and maritime disputes have pitted China against several Southeast Asian neighbours. Continue reading “Japan’s Delicate Balancing Act in the South China Sea”

Philippines-China Relations, 2001–2008: Dovetailing National Interests
by Charles Joseph De Guzman / Download the full paper here

This study shows that the Joint Marine Seismic Undertaking (JMSU) between China and the Philippines is an attempt of both countries to advance their respective national interests. Arguing that the foreign policies of China and the Philippines dovetailed during the administration of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, the study situates the JMSU as (1) part of China’s overall foreign policy in Southeast Asia and (2) as an attempt to maintain good relations with the Philippines and help resolve tensions related to the South ChinaSea disputes between the Philippines and China. The paper also shows that (3) the JMSU, along with Chinese ODA, dovetailed with the Philippine government’s plan to promote economic development and facilitate energy security. Citing significant documents compiled by government agencies, newspaper and online articles, government officials’ speeches, and academic journals, the study shows how the Chinese official development assistance (ODA) coincided and ran parallel to the signing of the Joint Maritime Seismic Undertaking. In conclusion, the study suggests a direct, causal link, not just conjunction, among Chinese ODA, the advancement of Beijing’s security interests, and the signing of the JMSU.