Geopolitics in the South China Sea: Expansionism in the Shadow of North Korean Drama

By Stephen Nagy / GeoPoliticalMonitor

The world’s attention has been captured by the political drama emanating out of Pyongyang and Washington. The cat-and-mouse posturing prior to a potential June summit that may lead to an incremental denuclearization over what is likely going to be a generation masks the critical and potential irreversible geopolitical machinations occurring in the South China Sea (SCS) as China expands its military, economic, and diplomatic influence in the region. Continue reading “Geopolitics in the South China Sea: Expansionism in the Shadow of North Korean Drama”

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WIDODO’S PEACE FORMULA FOR SOUTH CHINA SEA

BY ZURAIDAH IBRAHIM / 29 APR 2017/ SCMP

States involved in the South China Sea dispute should engage in “concrete cooperation” well before any code of conduct is developed, Indonesian President Joko Widodo has proposed. Continue reading “WIDODO’S PEACE FORMULA FOR SOUTH CHINA SEA”

A looming environmental disaster in the South China Sea

10 Apr 2017|Anthony Bergin / The Strategist

Most of the attention in the South China Sea has focused on China’s military activities. But the impending natural disaster there is also cause for concern. As a recent report makes clear there’s been significant coral loss due to sea water warming. But apart from ocean warming, the Chinese government, through over-fishing and reef destruction, is contributing to the devastation. Continue reading “A looming environmental disaster in the South China Sea”

Exclusive: At strategic shoal, China asserts power through control, and concessions

By Martin Petty / April 09, 2017/ Reuters

Far out in the South China Sea, where dark blue meets bright turquoise, a miles-long row of fishing boats anchor near Scarborough Shoal, backed by a small armada of coastguard projecting China’s power in Asia’s most disputed waters.

China still calls the shots at the prime fishing spot and has boosted its fleet there, nine months after an international panel ruled its blockade of the lagoon was illegal. Continue reading “Exclusive: At strategic shoal, China asserts power through control, and concessions”

Language Matters: How a Minor Mistranslation Can Affect US-China Relations

By Julian Ku / April 1, 2017 / Lawfareblog

Earlier this week, Reuters posted a short report quoting the official spokesman of China’s Ministry of National Defense as saying “there is no such thing as man-made islands” in response to a question about the South China Sea. This curious statement was quoted in the story’s headline, and the quote and the story were then republished by several other media outlets around the world. These stories led Sebastian Gorka, a top official on the U.S. National Security Council, to deride China’s statement by pointing out that the islands can be seen on Google Earth.  Gorka then went on to decry China’s “territorial expansionism.” Continue reading “Language Matters: How a Minor Mistranslation Can Affect US-China Relations”

Japan’s Master Plan to Defend Itself from China

by Kyle Mizokami / October 23, 2016 / NationalInterest.org

For decades, Tokyo’s plans to defend the homeland were frozen in amber. During the Cold War it was assumed, that in the event of war the Soviet Union would invade the northern one-third of the country. A powerful tank corps to contest a Soviet landing, a strong air force to beat back city-destroying bombers and a strong destroyer force to keep open the sea-lanes would be all that was needed to hold out until the Americans arrived. Continue reading “Japan’s Master Plan to Defend Itself from China”

Risk of South China Sea conflict could rise after US destroyer sails near disputed islands under Chinese control, experts say

by Laura Zhou / October 22, 2016 / South China Morning Post

The risk of conflict in the South China Sea could increase following the latest “freedom of navigation” exercise by the US Navy in the disputed waters, experts warn.

On Friday, the guided-missile destroyer USS Decatur challenged “excessive maritime claims” near Triton and Woody islands in the Paracel Islands chain, US officials said. Vietnam and Taiwan also have claims in the Paracels. Continue reading “Risk of South China Sea conflict could rise after US destroyer sails near disputed islands under Chinese control, experts say”

Japan: 7 Chinese Coast Guard Ships, 230 Fishing Boats in Disputed East China Sea Waters